Buddhism 101: Ethics

BUDDHISM as an ETHICAL WAY to LIVE

We understand that India’s social caste system was unimportant to Buddha. He keenly focused on the the world within… the outside world mattered little. He created the first monastery known where men and women lived together. He openly ordained women as nuns in a society where women were second class citizens to men. Frankly, he didn’t honor societal status or divisions. His teachings were for the common good of everyone and he encouraged his followers to spread his message.

We also know Buddha didn’t much respect the elaborate Vedic religious rituals so popular in his day (sounds a bit like Jesus’s disdain for Jewish priestly classes and money changers in the Temple of Jerusalem). He created the sangha – a community of similar believers brought together for the common good. Buddhism is meant to live out in community. The Sangha brings Buddhism to life and keeps it alive.

Avoid The Three Poisons of greed, anger and ignorance by practicing generosity, compassion and wisdom.
Think for yourself, ask questions, discuss and debate. Don’t believe anything on blind faith.

Morality is simple: Be compassionate.

The Five Moral Precepts
Respect all life. Don’t kill.
Honor everything that’s not yours. Don’t steal. Return what you borrow.
Refrain from sexual misconduct and sensual overindulgence.
Tell the truth. Don’t lie or gossip.
Avoid intoxication. Remain mindful. Remain focused. Keep a clear head.

Take control of yourself. Be in charge of your thinking, feeling and behaviors.

Meditate!

Buddha taught that everything is interconnected and interdependent. Enlightenment had shown him the oneness of all creation. Living is the unity of the physical and spiritual. We are spiritual beings experiencing physicality. The self and its environment are one and inseparable. Everything around us is the reflection of our inner lives. Mind and body are one. Equality of gender, race and creed are paramount. Respect for all living things is now… it is NOT the goal. We are all one.

“Do not overlook tiny good actions, thinking they are of no benefit; even tiny drops of water in the end will fill a huge vessel.”

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Buddhism 101: Ethics

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